Goodbye to Three Weeks

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2014 fieldcrew, top row L to R: Alex Hulse, Mike Roller, Judy Joklik, Kerry Robinson, Jim Kuzma; bottom row, L to R: Justin Uehlein, Camille Westmont, Teresa Robinson

 

This post comes from Camille Westmont, reflecting on our halfway point through the 2014 fieldschool:

It is with some sadness but much anticipation that we mark our halfway point for our time in Pardeesville this summer. We have covered a lot of ground and moved a lot of soil in only 15 days, and hopefully given a solid foundation to some of our fieldschool students.

While today marks the mid-point of our fieldwork, it also marks the end of Pardeesville fieldwork for Alex, Kerry, and Judy. These three have braved heat, rain, cold, and wind for three weeks on a steady diet of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, apples, and Ann’s homemade cookies. I am proud to say that I had a hand in shaping these students’ as archaeologists and their work attests to the incredible advances they’ve made in these three short weeks. Good job, gang!

Turning my attention toward the ground, we’ve also made some important progress with regards to the site! In 15 working days, we have opened, excavated, and refilled six excavation units of 5 feet-by-5 feet or larger in size (all done by hand). Their depths have ranged from just over a foot deep to nearly seven feet deep! With a constantly changing crew of between four and eight people, this amount of progress is awesome!

While I’m sad to see our first batch go, I know these students will go on to do wonderful things, and I can’t wait to see where their futures take them and how they apply what they’ve learned here in Pardeesville.

It won’t be the same without you kids, and we hope to see you out here again next year!

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About LM Project

The LMP is a collaborative endeavor which aims to recognize the events surrounding the Lattimer Massacre, an incident that changed the labor movement and impacted the world by bringing to light economic disparities and ethnic tensions in the anthracite region of PA.
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